Paula Hammond: Women in Chemistry

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Published on Sep 10, 2012 by ChemHeritage Paula Hammond is in pursuit of the invisible. In her lab at MIT she creates technologies so small that you can’t see them with most microscopes—that is, until they save a soldier’s life

Reginald Van Lee

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Reggie Van Lee Executive Vice President Reginald Van Lee is an Executive Vice President at Booz Allen Hamilton’s Washington DC location, where he leads the firm’s federal and commercial health businesses, and the not-for-profit business. He has deep expertise in

Intuitively Obvious Vol. 1

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Felecia Davis

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Student Profile: Felecia Davis Hometown Pasadena CA New York NY Undergraduate Work BS Engineering, Tufts University School of Engineering Master’s Work Master of Architecture, Princeton University School of Architecture Degree Candidate PhD Design and Computation, MIT School of Architecture +

Robert Robinson Taylor

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Few blacks were part of the MIT community in its early years, even though founder William Barton Rogers had shown a keen interest in issues relating to race. In 1863, Rogers had praised blacks–particularly the bravery exhibited by black troops

Joseph R. Applegate

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A profile of MIT’s first black faculty member, Professor Joseph R. Applegate, a linguistics expert who came to the Institute in 1955 and worked on machine translation. In May 1956, MIT vice president and provost Julius A. Stratton issued a

William Arthur Johnson

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William Arthur Johnson was born on April 12, 1871, the son of Mrs. A. E. Johnson of Jamestown, Rhode Island—a small community not far from Newport. Before entering MIT, he attended Rogers High School in Newport. In May 1890 he

Richard Henry Lewis

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Born on 10 November 1874, Richard Henry Lewis was the son of Louisa E. F. Lewis of West Roxbury, Massachusetts. After graduating from Boston Latin School, he sat the MIT admissions exam, passed all subjects, and was admitted as a

Frederick John Hemmings

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Born on 2 October 1873, Frederick John Hemmings was the son of Robert W. Hemmings of Boston. After graduating from English High School in Boston, he entered MIT as a regular student on 26 September 1893 and was admitted to

Reginald Van Lee’s Perspective on the Clinton Global Initiative

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